Sunday, March 28, 2010

AIR POLLUTION INDOORS.

If you don't have asthma or other respiratory problems, then you're probably not aware of the level of AIR POLLUTION INDOORS, be it in the home or office. But, it's there. For example, everytime someone walks across  the floor, it stirs up a whirlwind of irritants. These pollutants can include human skin particles, pet dander, dust mites, mold spores, et cetera.

To prevent indoor air pollution, you should "vacuum" carpets and rugs thoroughly at least once a week. More often if you have pet cats and dogs indoors. The best type of vacuum cleaners are those that do not use paper or cloth bags. Such containers like cups and bags collect all the dirt and dust in. Almost often, cups and containers systems are stored away after use, and as such become breeding grounds for bacteria, virus, molds and such other ills. Tendency is to use the dirt cup without being cleaned or the bags without being emptied or changed,  after each use and as such two issues result. Firstly as the bag or cup gets filled, the suctioning action of your vacuum is reduced and secondly but very deadly what flies out of the exhaust into the vacuumed area is highly toxic air of bacteria, virus and fowl odor of rotting dirt . 

AIR POLLUTION INDOORS affects everyone. But people who suffer from respiratory problems, allergies, or wear contact lens feel the effects the most. Common symptoms of AIR POLLUTION INDOORS include headaches, sneezing, coughing, fatigue, congestion, sore throat, dizziness, and upset stomach. 

Another source of AIR POLLUTION INDOORS is your air conditioner that has not been serviced for months; air conditioning ducts; newly bought furniture releasing fumes of its glues and lacquer, aerosols used in doors, fumes from cooking gas and a host of others including dry-cleaned clothing just brought in from the laundry. The chemicals that commercial dry cleaners use are toxic. To prevent indoor air pollution, don't immediately place dry cleaned clothing in your closet. Instead, remove the plastic and hang the items up outside for a day or so. Then, re-cover the clothing with the protective plastic and hang them in your closet. 

If you don't already have plants in your home, you should consider getting some. Plants like ferns and the type with broad palm leaves are considered to work the best. Research shows that plants actually help remove toxins from the air in your home. To help prevent indoor air pollution, the rule of thumb is placing one plant in every ten square yards of floor space. 


Complimentary in-door air quality demos in Kuala Lumpur/ Selangor, Malaysia on request from k.thiru@hotmail.com              016-3712762



Thursday, March 18, 2010

AIR PARTICULATES

Particulates in Our Indoor Air


We often lightly brush off with simple words like, "the air is dusty, these days".
That may be just a simple truth. The naked eye cannot see the immense amount of very very minute and invisible particles afloat in the air. 
All that is inhaled is actually a primary threat to health. The particles evade the body's filtering mechanisms and penetrate deep into lung tissue, and often carrying toxic substances that are easily absorbed into the body. 
Studies have shown these inhaled particulates to cross the placental barrier as well and affect the foetus.These foreign substances trigger the body's natural defense mechanisms, often provoking an overactive immune response that leads to chronic or acute allergy symptoms.
Common harmful particulate contaminants found in our homes and offices include fine dust, dust mites, pet dander, mold spores, and pollen. 
What about toxic gases and emissions from modern technology surrounding us? 
Some allergic reactions are severe - asthma is the best known and one of the most serious. Other allergic conditions are subtle chronic conditions. Runny nose, watery eyes, recurring headaches, lethargy, even snoring can all be symptoms of allergy.                                                                                                 Many people endure these conditions, not knowing that they are allergy-related and that prevention is readily available. Very common and more specific allergens are dust; dust mites; pollens; mold, pet furs; pet dander and many more, both indoors and outdoors. 

Complimentary in-door air quality demos in Kuala Lumpur/ Selangor, Malaysia on request from k.thiru@hotmail.com              016-3712762

Thursday, March 11, 2010

AIR PARTICLES and CONTENTS

Particulate in Our Indoor Air

pet dander allergies
Minute, invisible particles in the air are a primary threat to health.      They evade the body's filtering mechanisms and penetrate deep into lung tissue, carrying toxic substances that can be absorbed in the body.   They trigger the body's natural defense mechanisms, often provoking an overactive immune response that leads to chronic or acute allergy symptoms.
Common harmful particulate contaminants found in our homes and offices include fine dust, dust mites, pet dander, mold spores, and pollen.
Some allergic reactions are severe - asthma is the best known and one of the most serious. Other allergic conditions are subtle chronic conditions.                                                                                                  Runny nose, watery eyes, recurring headaches, lethargy, even snoring can all be symptoms of allergy. Many people endure these conditions, not knowing that they are allergy-related and that prevention is readily available. Some of the most specific common allergens are: DUST and DUST MITE ALLERGIES; POLLEN ALLERGIES;  TOXIC MOLD ALLERGIES;  PET DANDER; TOXIC GASES                                                                                                                                          
Gases in Our Indoor Air
airborne smoke reduces air quality
Gases are as much a risk to our health as airborne particles.
Among the greatest concerns to health are the volatile organic compounds, or VOC's. These gases, up to 500 of them, are dispersed from cleaning solutions, carpets, building materials, plastics, and many chemicals commonly used around the home.
Formaldehyde is the chief concern among the VOC's, as it is so widely used. Its effects show up normally in itching of the eyes, ears and throat, but it is implicated more seriously as a carcinogen.
Tobacco smoke, radon, and fumes from fuel combustion (from furnaces, gas stoves, and our cars) also invade our homes and are responsible for indoor air quality problems. 

What can we do to improve our indoor air quality?

Every house or place of business abounds with potential air quality risks. It is important to deal with these risks in an intelligent manner.
The first step is to prevent contaminants, where at all possible, from entering the home. Your home environment is unique. Indoor air quality will depend on humidity, the age of your home, the type of heating, the choice of furnishing and insulation materials, the presence of pets or smokers, and so forth. By taking steps to reduce the creation of new contaminants in your home by choosing cleaners and building materials carefully, avoiding smoking in the home, keeping windows closed during high pollen days, etc. is the most important thing you can do to reduce your exposure to harmful indoor air contaminants.
Balanced management of your whole home environment is the constructive way to healthy living. Keep aware of the risk factors and avoid them where you can. Using fewer aerosol products, for example, is a positive contribution to the health of your home. Small sure steps are often more effective than a giant leap. Awareness and common sense are your best guides.
After controlling the sources, you can now take aggressive action to remove indoor air pollution from your home using an air cleaner specific to your situation. Most doctors will tell you to avoid substances that provoke allergies. But medical advice too often stops there.
Real preventive health in your home means going after offensive allergens and chemicals and positively eliminating them.
There are a variety of air cleaners on the market, many of which will do an excellent job of removing both particulate and gaseous contaminants, as well as harmful microorganisms like bacteria and viruses, from your indoor air.                                                                                                                                                          
Since no single air purifier is perfect at removing all types of contaminants, choose an air filter or purifier that focuses on the contaminants most likely to be found in your home or that give you the greatest air quality concerns.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

POLLUTION AFFECTS HEALTH

Air pollution affects all individuals.                                                                                                                    Not all have good immunity system. not all are strong, not all are allergic, and not all get affected equally. Some become permanent victims of pollution, others bear the brunt with "health scars" and some do die. We can say that all do get beaten, for we all have to breathe. The scientists, environmentalists and the researchers stand unanimous:  air pollution has significant negative impacts on our health.   Why is there an upsurge in so many premature deaths, longer hospital stays, the emergence of several respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and cancer? The link between air pollution and health is a topic under scrutiny for many years. In 2002, a study, published in prestigious "The Lancet", has systematically reviewed the research on the subject published over a period of 20 years. Until 2002, there were just a little more than 500 studies per year and published in scientific medical journals worldwide. 
In 2005, this number had reached almost 1500! Many of these studies were conducted over several years with several cohorts of up to millions of people. More pollution, more diseases is the conclusion. Studies show that migrants from the rural to the urban start to show respiratory related illnesses. They are non-smokers and non-allergic and many start to show shortness of breath, wheezing and even asthma. This is not to be considered as normal or taken lightly. Research concludes that the pollution of the city and the increase of pollutants in the air causes a direct increase in cardio respiratory disease and mortality associated with them, and a reduction in life expectancy of up to one or two years.                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                    
By comparison, smokers on average live 1.4 to 2.7 years less than those who do not smoke. Nevertheless, the individual risk of contracting a disease or showing a health problem because of air pollution is relatively low. Thus, the World Health Organization estimated in 2002 that it would allocate 1.4% of all premature deaths in the world to air pollution in urban areas. The individual risk is lower than that associated with other factors, like smoking, for an example. Thus, in Canada, it is estimated that air pollution causes 16,000 premature deaths, while smoking causes 45 000. Air pollution risks may be lower, but people die. According to statistics from Health Canada, in Quebec, a city of 600,000 inhabitants, 400 people die each year from air pollution. Some people say that these are only figures based on theoretical models .                           What worries health officials is that air pollution affects a very large number of people, virtually the entire population, and that fact cannot be denied. It is also being pointed out that people are getting to be more and more relatively confined within "boxed and sealed units".                                   It was rare, the choice of the air we had to breathe. We can choose not to smoke, but can we chose not to breathe? Thus, the number of illnesses and premature deaths resulting from pollution of the air is still growing. Even when concentrations of pollutants are extremely low, the effect on human health can be measured. 
                                                    
Complimentary in-door air quality demos in Kuala Lumpur/ Selangor, Malaysia on request from k.thiru@hotmail.com              016-3712762